Month: December 2022

» Best of 2022: Podcasts

Best of 2022: Podcasts

By Eric Cressey on December 29, 2022 at 6:22 am

2022 marks 4 years of the Elite Baseball Development Podcast. In all, we released 36 episodes in 2022 – and I learned a ton from some great guests. That said, here are our top five episodes of the year:

1. Navigating Youth Baseball Development and College Recruiting with Walter Bied – Baseball dad, coach, author and consultant Walter Beede joins us for a multi-faceted conversation on a variety of topics that are essential for baseball families to understand. I’ve known Walter for over 15 years, and in addition to having more passion for baseball than anyone I’ve ever met, he’s also helped many families navigate the landscape of travel ball and college recruiting.

2. College Baseball Strength and Conditioning Considerations with Zach Dechant – Texas Christian University Assistant Athletic Director of Human Performance Jack DeChant oversees baseball development at TCU. In this discussion with guest host John O’Neill, Zach shares insights into the long-term development of college athletes, discusses his offseason work with alumni moving on to professional baseball, and outlines the key skills he looks to develop in coaches. consultant

3. Principles of Energy DevelopmentI flew solo for this podcast, since I covered one topic: power development. My goal here was to take a large, seemingly complex topic and break it down into digestible component parts.

4. Versatile pitching development with Matt Hinckley – Matt Hinckley joined the Cressey Sports Performance – FL staff in late 2021 and has done a tremendous job with our pitching department.. In this podcast, we cover a wide range of pitching topics, including:

  • How to connect the dots between pitching mechanics and strength and conditioning
  • How to use high-speed cameras for pitch design
  • Why planning the annual competition calendar is so important
  • When to use fine tuning vs extensive overhaul
  • Why is he more of a “pitching manager” than a “pitching coach”?
  • Why the mental aspect of pitching can never be overlooked

5. Understanding Anterior Shoulder Pain with Dr. David Altchek – Dr. David Altchek of the Hospital for Special Surgery and the New York Mets shares some outstanding clinical insights into the diagnosis and treatment of anterior shoulder pain in overhead throwing athletes.

Finally, while I’ve got your attention, don’t forget to check out our flagship sponsor of the past year, Athletic Greens. It’s an all-in-one superfood supplement containing 75 whole food ingredients designed to support your body’s nutritional needs in 5 key areas of health: 1) Energy, 2) Immune System, 3) Gut Health, 4) Hormones Support and 5 ) healthy aging. the head www.AthleticGreens.com/cressey And claim my special offer today – 10 free travel packs – with your first purchase. I use this product daily and recommend it to our athletes as well. I would encourage you to give it a shot – especially with this great offer.

We’re back to regular EricCressey.com content this coming week. Thanks for all your support in 2022! We have some great things planned for 2023.

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» Elite Baseball Development Podcast: The Problem with Average

Elite Baseball Development Podcast: The Problem with Averages

By Eric Cressey on December 29, 2022 at 6:35 am

I’m flying solo for this week’s podcast, because I wanted to tackle what I believe to be one of the most important considerations in player development in baseball. Much training tends to overvalue “averages” and undervalue external qualities – and in doing so, actually interferes with the development of some athletes.

Before we get to the show though, a special thanks to this episode’s sponsor, Athletic Greens. the head http://www.athleticgreens.com/cressey And you get a free 10-pack of Athletic Greens travel packets with your first order.

Sponsor Reminder

This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. It’s an all-in-one superfood supplement containing 75 whole food ingredients designed to support your body’s nutritional needs in 5 key areas of health: 1) Energy, 2) Immune System, 3) Gut Health, 4) Hormones support and 5 ) healthy aging. the head www.AthleticGreens.com/cressey And claim my special offer today – 20 free travel packs ($79 value) – with your first purchase. I use this product daily and recommend it to our athletes as well. I would encourage you to give it a shot – especially with this great offer.

Podcast feedback

If you like what you hear, we’d be thrilled if you’d consider subscribing to the podcast and leaving us an iTunes review. You can do so here.

And, we welcome your suggestions for future guests and questions. Just email [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Sign-up for our free baseball newsletter today and get instant access to a 47-minute presentation from Eric Cressey on personalizing the management of overhead athletes!


» Best of 2022: Guest Posts

Best of 2022: Guest Posts

By Eric Cressey on December 28, 2022 at 4:03 am

I’ve already highlighted the top articles I’ve had on EricCressey.com in 2022, so now it’s time for the best guest posts of the year. Here goes…

1. Exercise of the week: Barbell drop split-squat – Cressey Sports Performance – MA coach Ethan Dyer introduces a single-leg progression that offers some added advantages over the classic lunge and split squats.

2. 5 Warm-up Options to Improve Hip Extension – The ability to access hip extension while opposing hip flexes is important in sprinting, throwing, hitting, and countless other athletic endeavors. In this article, Cressy Sports Performance – Florida coach Dylan Lees outlines a few dynamic ways to challenge hip extension in the warm-up.

3. 5 Drills for Dynamic Trunk Reduction – Cressy Sports Performance – Florida coach Eduardo Valle shares five deceleration drills that are helpful for almost any type of athlete, but especially in the rotational realm we live in every day.

4. 4 Training Principles to Maximize Your Speed – In today’s world of strength and community there is a heavy bias towards contralateral stress and rowing, and as Ethan Dyer shares (again!) in this article, we need to give the ipsilateral options some love.

5. Wall March variations to winWall marches are drills that have been commonly used in the strength and conditioning and track and field communities for years. Unfortunately, many instructors don’t realize how much you can build on the basic wall march to teach different movement skills. In this article, Dylan Lees shares some of our favorite variations on this classic drill.

I will be back soon with more highlights of 2022.

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» Best of 2022: Strength and Conditioning Essays

Best of 2022: Strength and Conditioning Articles

By Eric Cressey on December 24, 2022 at 1:15 pm

As 2022 draws to a close, I’m using this last week of the year to take you back to some of the most popular content from the past 12 months on EricCressey.com, as this “series” has been quite popular over the past few years. Today, we start with the most popular articles of the year; According to my hosting stats these are the ones that get the most traffic.

1. Why we shouldn’t compare kids in sports – One of the trends I see in youth sports is how often the youngest kids are compared to their peers. In this article, I dig into the problems with this approach:

2. Position vs pressure– About 15 years ago, I attended a two-day course with Dr. William Brady, a respected chiropractor and manual therapist in the Boston area. He said on the occasion, “Biomechanics is a combination of physics and biology. Put another way, it’s the study of loads applied to human tissue.” This was the most succinct and comprehensive definition of biomechanics I’d ever heard, so I frantically jotted it down in my notes—and to this day I keep it in the back of my mind every time I evaluate movement. The article explains why.

3. Why you can’t feel your serratus anterior work – I received an inquiry from a follower who asked why exercises targeting serratus anterior are so difficult to “feel”. There is a fair amount to unpack on this topic, so I recorded this video on the subject.

4. Exercise of the Week: Slideboard Lateral Lunge with Eccentric Band Overload – I got this exercise from my friend, Ben Bruno – and it’s obviously not just a hit with me, because it got a lot of traffic when I shared it with a baseball-focused audience.

5. Exercise of the Week: Supported Elbow Car – This was my New Year’s Day 2022 post, and it has stood the test of time as one of the most popular topics of the year.

I’ll be back soon with another “Best of 2022” feature. Next, the best guest post of the year!

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» CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Jake Fishman

CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Jake Fishman

By Eric Cressey on December 22, 2022 at 5:52 am

We welcome Oakland A’s pitcher Jake Fishman to the latest podcast. Jake’s rise to the big leagues is a remarkable example of perseverance; His story touches on how difficult it is to make it “on the show” and how players must be open to reinventing themselves and adjusting as the level of competition increases. Jake also holds the distinction of being the only former Creasy Sports Performance intern to make it to the Major Leagues. CSP-MA Director of Performance John O’Neill also leads as guest host.

Special thanks to this event sponsor, Athletic Greens. the head http://www.athleticgreens.com/cressey And you get a free 10-pack of Athletic Greens travel packets with your first order.

You can follow Jack on Instagram @swedish fishman1.

Sponsor Reminder

This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. It’s an NSF-certified all-in-one superfood supplement with 75 whole-food source ingredients designed to meet your body’s nutritional needs in 5 key areas of health: 1) Energy, 2) Immunity, 3) Gut Health, 4) hormone support, and 5) healthy aging. the head www.AthleticGreens.com/cressey And claim my special offer today – 10 free travel packs – with your first purchase. I use this product daily and recommend it to our athletes as well. I would encourage you to give it a shot – especially with this great offer.

Podcast feedback

If you like what you hear, we’d be thrilled if you’d consider subscribing to the podcast and leaving us an iTunes review. You can do so here.

And, we welcome your suggestions for future guests and questions. Just email [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Sign-up for our free baseball newsletter today and get instant access to a 47-minute presentation from Eric Cressy on personalizing the management of overhead athletes!


Top 5 Cable Tricep Workouts

You’ve probably asked yourself “What is triceps?“And how do I work them? Well, they’re the muscles at the back of the upper arm, which are responsible for fully extending the elbow joints and bending the arm toward the body. But instead of being a single muscle, they’re made up of three heads: Lateral, longAnd intermediate.

Your triceps are an important cluster whether you want to avoid joint injuries, perform endless pull-up sets at the gym, or hold that over-packed grocery cart steady as you push it through the parking lot. So, what tricep exercises can you do to strengthen this muscle group? While you can do plenty of tricep exercises with dumbbells, not everyone is comfortable with them or likes to use them. Here, find 5 ways to use your gym’s cable machines to build tricep strength and give your arms a 360º tone-up.

#1 Triceps pushdown

To kickstart your next triceps workout, aim for yours lateral head With a tried and true exercise: the triceps pushdown. Whether you’re early on in your fitness journey or not, the tricep pushdown is a great exercise that not only strengthens the triceps muscle group and targets the lateral head, but can help prevent muscle injuries.

To perform this tricep exercise, you need to set up a cable machine at a comfortable weight a few feet apart. Here’s what to do:

  1. Facing the cable machine with a straight spine and shoulders pulled back
  2. Keep your elbows at your sides and grab the bar with both hands
  3. Bending at the elbows, pull the bar down until your arms are fully extended
  4. Slowly allow the elbows to flex and lift the bar. Repeat.

Workout tip: If you find that you have to move your back, shoulders or hips to pull the bar down, that’s your sign to choose a lower weight. The more you can isolate the motion in your arms, the better you will work your triceps.

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#2 One-arm overhead extension

The overhead triceps extension (otherwise known as the “Superwoman extension”) trains you long head one arm at a time. Although a variation of this tricep exercise works both arms simultaneously, exercising the muscles individually can help isolate and correct muscle imbalances.

To get started, you just need a handle grip with cables installed below chest level. Here’s how to do a cable overhead triceps extension:

  1. Facing away from the machine, place the foot opposite the hand you started with in front of the other foot. Begin by gently bending your knees and leaning your body slightly forward (like how a runner might start a run).
  2. Grab the handle with one hand and raise your elbow to your ear, maintaining a 90-degree bend in your elbow.
  3. Pull the bar to fully extend your arms while keeping your active wrists stable. Repeat, then switch to the other side.

#3 Lying triceps extension

This is the workout target three heads Tricep’s at once. For tricep extensions, you need a flat bench, a pulley installed near the base of the machine, and a narrow overhand grip.

Place the bench a foot or so in front of the pulley and begin this tricep workout:

  1. Lie on the bench on your back and place your feet firmly on the ground at a 90-degree angle.
  2. Extend your arms straight above you and grasp with both hands. Arms and wrists should be perpendicular to the rest of your body.
  3. Stabilize your upper arms, tuck the elbows and bend at the elbows. The pulley should stop just above your forehead before you begin the next rep.

#4 Reverse-Grip Pushdown

This exercise is similar to the triceps pushdown, but it targets the long and middle head.

Start on a chin up machine with a straight bar and begin:

  1. Facing the machine, hold the ends of the bar with both hands and lean forward slightly.
  2. Pull the bar down in front of your chest, guiding the elbows against your torso. Your elbows should have a 90-degree angle.
  3. Now, pull the bar from the elbows until your arms reach full extension. Repeat.

#5 One-arm horizontal tricep extension

Complete triceps day with an exercise that targets the lateral, long and medial heads in one fell swoop—when Build elbow strength. This tricep extension workout is unique, as it involves pulling the cable sideways instead of up and down.

Set up your dumbbells at chest height and begin:

  1. Stand with feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and only one side of your body facing the machine. Hold the handle with the hand farthest from the machine.
  2. Raise your arms to chest height, parallel to the floor. Bend the elbows so that your hands are at 90 degrees towards you.
  3. Now, move your upper arm back and let your arm extend with it. In the final position, your entire arm should be completely straight and parallel to the floor.
  4. Repeat for several repetitions. Then, repeat on the other side.

Build strength and confidence with Choose Fitness

With each tricep exercise, you’ll be on your way to strengthening the muscle group and building stronger triceps. As you’re playing with this cable tricep exercise, 3 to 4 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions each is a good jumping-off point. That said, it never hurts to get workout recommendations tailored just for you—and if you’re looking for guidance, that’s where we’ve come.

A Choose Fitness, our friendly fitness experts want to send you on your fitness adventure with the advice and inspiration you need to boost your confidence and achieve your goals. Our community of fitness enthusiasts welcomes people at every stage of their fitness journey—to get you started, search to find a location near you.gym near me“Online and Now let’s start Today.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Muscle strength and balance are important for healthy joints. https://uihc.org/health-topics/muscle-strength-and-balance-are-important-healthy-joints
  2. ACE Fitness. One-sided training facility. https://www.acefitness.org/resources/pros/expert-articles/7035/the-benefits-of-unilateral-training/
  3. Fits very well. How to do tricep pushdowns: proper form, variations, and common mistakes. https://www.verywellfit.com/how-to-do-the-triceps-pushdown-3498613
  4. NCBI. Anatomy, Shoulder and Upper Limb, Triceps Muscles. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK536996/

How to prevent shin splints

How to prevent shin splints

If you’ve ever experienced the radiating pain of a shin splint, you know that this injury can be painful enough to make you hang up your running shoes for the foreseeable future. And while they’re one of the more common athletic injuries, they can be hugely frustrating for both gym newbies and committed athletes.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to reduce your chances of developing them, from refining your running footwork to making room for a cool-down post-sweat session at the gym. Below, we look at what causes shin splints and tips for keeping the muscles and bones below your knees in tip-top shape.

What is a shin splint?

First, a quick refresher on anatomy: the tibia The large bone in the front of your foot that runs from your knee to your ankle. As you can imagine, these bones do some heavy lifting when it comes to keeping you upright when you stand or walk.

When you feel pain in a shin splint (or what doctors say Medial tibial stress syndrome), what you’re experiencing is inflammation of the muscles and tendons in your lower leg. These muscles pull and pull against the bone after repeated stress, causing the area to become inflamed, swollen, and painful.

What causes shin splints?

Inflammation in your tibia, or shin bone, and the surrounding area can be caused by a variety of physical activities, from going to work in the morning to scrimmaging the local soccer turf at your neighborhood park.

Although anyone can get shin splints, some people—especially active people—may be more prone to getting them:1

  • Runners
  • football player
  • the dancer
  • Members of the military
  • People with flat feet
  • Those who are deficient in vitamin D2
  • People with osteoporosis
  • Those who exercise in unsupported shoes

But don’t worry because there are certain steps you can take to continue your physical activity and prevent severe shin splint pain.

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How to prevent shin splints while running

Shin splints are commonly seen in runners, especially new runners. The pressure of repeated and high speed foot strikes against the pavement can quickly send your tibia directly into the inflamed area.

Although the condition is common, there are several steps you can take to prevent shin splints:1

  • Plant your feet properly – If you run with your ankle turned, or your foot rolled, your front leg muscles have to work harder to stabilize you. Aim to keep your feet evenly spaced as you run and you’ll reduce stress on your tibia.
  • Run on even terrain – Running on hills or hard surfaces (such as concrete) increases your chances of developing a shin splint.
  • Wear supportive footwear – The right footwear can have a significant impact not only on your lower leg muscles but on your overall body. Runners are encouraged to change their shoes every 350 to 500 miles.3 If you’ve got a flat foot, consider slipping insoles into your running shoes for extra support. Running shoes with shock-absorbing soles can also help reduce the impact of the pavement on your tibia and surrounding muscles.
  • Go easy on yourself – Runners are more likely to develop shin splints when they go too hard too quickly. If you are new to running, start training by gradually increasing your running distance. Don’t be afraid to stop and take a break if your shins start to hurt! Remember, there’s a difference between pushing through mental blocks and ignoring the pressure your body is giving you.

How to prevent shin splints at the gym

Runners aren’t the only people who can experience shin splints. If it seems like no matter what you do, your shin hurts the morning after a workout, you may be skipping these two anti-shin splint essentials:

  • Post-sweat stretch – When you’re done with a workout, don’t forget to wind down! Carving out some time for a luxurious calf muscle stretch at the end of your session can make a big difference in how you feel the day after a workout. This is also true when your lower leg muscles need to be stretched after a workout or physical activity.
  • Strength training – If you experience frequent shin splints and the problem isn’t your shoes or your form, consider adding a strength training segment to your workout. A simple strength exercise for runners, such as heel raises or toe raises, can help build the muscles around the front of your foot, reducing your risk of shin splints. Exercises that strengthen and stabilize your legs, ankles, hips, and core can also help relieve some of the stress on your tibia.4

At the end of the day, those who are committed to staying active may end up with shin splints. If they take you down, you are with the best athletes in the world! With a little guidance on how to increase your form (and plenty of room for recovery periods), you’ll build the resilience you need to stay active, however feels best for you.

For a safe, powerful workout, sweat with Choose Fitness

There are a few steps you can take to prevent shin splints that allow you to work without worrying about the strain and pain associated with them. Don’t let the fear of shin splints stop you from achieving your best. when you register with Choose FitnessYou’ll join an active community dedicated to honing their technique as they achieve their full-body fitness goals.

The team at your local Chuze location wants to help you stay motivated on your unique fitness journey, whether through group classes, 1:1 training sessions or working out. Ichuz App from home. Practice kindness Join the Chuze community today by searching just for you and your bodygym near me“Online.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. Mayo Clinic. Shin splints. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/shin-splints/symptoms-causes/syc-20354105
  2. National Institutes of Health. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with tibial bone pain and tenderness. A possible contributory role. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29314669/
  3. Runner’s World. Running Shoes FAQ. https://www.runnersworld.com/gear/a20806543/running-shoe-questions/
  4. Fits very well. 8 Ways to Prevent Shin Splints While Running https://www.verywellfit.com/how-to-prevent-shin-splints-2911057

Best Strength Exercises for Runners

Best Strength Exercises for Runners

All you have to do to run better is run more, right? Not quite. Strength training is an integral part of any good runner’s workout routine. To run like the wind must be strong than air

A strength workout for runners can not only help you run faster, but it can also help prevent future running injuries. Yet when running is the main focus of your workout plan, you can forget about strength training. Taking a few days off the track and spending time in your gym can pay dividends for your running ability and improve your overall health.

If you want to improve your running or get a leg up on your total-body fitness, we cover everything you need to know about running, strength training and combining the two below.

What are the benefits of strength training for runners?

As rewarding as it sounds, running can be a uniquely taxing workout for your body. Many runners suffer from chronic problems such as knee pain, shin splints and Achilles tendinitis. But strength training — when integrated into your running routine — can both help reduce tell-tale runner complaints:

  • Preventing injury from overuse or strain
  • Creating better running economy (so you can run faster)
  • Increased stability
  • Improve your form
  • Increase aerobic capacity
  • Driving up the metabolic rate
  • Correct muscle imbalances
  • Supports mental abilities (eg focus and self confidence)

Adding a strength training workout to your routine, even if it’s just one day, can have a significant impact on your body.

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The best core workout for runners

Looking to improve your core strength? A good core workout does more than just give you a luscious six-pack. Improving your core strength will help stabilize your spine, which will support your overall balance and stability. This translates into better form when you run – and it can also improve the quality of your breathing.

Fortunately, you can do core work in your routine at the gym, at the park, or in your downtime at home. Start by focusing on:

  • plank – This exercise is great for strengthening the upper body muscles, including the core and arms. Start by holding for 30 seconds. If you feel it, try to hold for 60 to 90 seconds. We recommend both front and side planks to tune up your obliques.
  • Bicycle crunches – Focus on keeping your back plugged into the mat to fully engage your core muscles. Start with a 60-second set; After a while, try going up to 90 seconds.
  • Highlighted above – Classic push-ups give you an extra arm workout. Start with a series of 20 push-ups. Increase to 40 as you build more strength.

Best Leg Workout for Runners

Obviously, feet are one of the most important parts of a runner’s body. The good news is that there are many strength exercises to add to your lower body workout plan. To get you started, these five go-tos can help build strong leg muscles and lower-body awareness:

  • Squats – Squats target all the muscles in your legs. This move will focus on your quads, glutes, hamstrings and calves. Start with one set of 15 and bump up to three sets of 15 if you want.
  • the lungs – Although you’ll really feel the benefit in your legs, lunges are a full-body move that activates the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, shoulders and core muscles. This move also increases the mobility of your hips. Start with 15 lunges on each side, then work your way up to three sets of 10.
  • Burpees – This full-body exercise gets your heart rate up while building strength in both your lower and upper body. For runners, a single set of 20 is a great starting point.
  • heel raise – Activate the muscles that run along the back of your foot and work on your balance by raising the heel. To start, try three sets of 10.
  • Raise your toes – You only need to do 15 to 20 toe raises to see the effect on your shin strength, which can be a lifesaver when wondering how to prevent shin splints. (Translation? No more shin splints.)

These strength exercises also do not require heavy weight lifting. Some of these can be done with your body weight or light weights. A squat, for example, can be done as a bodyweight exercise. The importance here is that you are strengthening each muscle group.

How many times a week should runners do strength training?

Runners should hit the gym twice a week for strength training in addition to the standard schedule of running and recovery days.

Ideally, you’ll space the strength training sessions so that they don’t fall off immediately before doing quick work. Pushing them too close together can cause fatigue, compromising your ability to perform at speed. Setting up your running and training plan efficiently is important to knowing you’re getting the energy work you need without stressing your body.

How long should strength training last?

Depending on your goals, a strength training session should last from 30 to 60 minutes.

Of course, if you’re training for an upcoming marathon, you might want to hit the gym longer. That said, if life gets messy and you can only spend 15 minutes on strength training, make them count! Where this type of workout is concerned, duration or number of reps are not as important as the quality of your form.

Build energy for your run at Choose Fitness

Even if you run alone, it helps to train in a community. Stop into one nearby Choose Fitness location and our friendly and knowledgeable team will guide you and help you develop your fitness goals Fitness class Enjoy one before relaxing your sore muscles Hydromassage.

Whether you’re looking for a pep talk on the treadmill or someone to cheer you on during your vigorous workout, our fitness experts en-choose– iastic about helping you achieve your goals.

Whatever you choose, find a choice Gyms near you Jump-start your strength training and burn seconds off your mile times before you know it.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. Fits very well. Strength training workouts for runners. https://www.verywellfit.com/strengthening-workouts-for-runners-2911909
  2. The runner’s blueprint. Top 7 Strength Training Exercises for Runners (2020 Update). https://www.runnersblueprint.com/strength-training-for-runners/

6 tricep exercises with dumbbells

6 tricep exercises with dumbbells

If it’s arm day and you’re ready to give your triceps some attention, you might naturally just gravitate towards the machine. But these tools aren’t the only ally for toning the upper arm muscles—dumbbell workouts can be just as effective as tricep workouts, with some choice benefits of their own.

The advantage of free weight tricep training lies in its versatility: not only does your range of motion increase, but dumbbells are also required. our To take the lead rather than relying on a machine to do the work for us.

Ready to strengthen muscle groups and build strong triceps? Whether you’re hitting the gym or working out at home, this guide will highlight 6 superior tricep exercises to try with dumbbells. Plus, we’ll give some expert tips on picking the perfect weight and rep count for your next upper-body sweat session.

Why Exercise Your Triceps With Dumbbells?

Located at the back of the upper arms, our triceps are responsible for bringing the arms toward the body, stabilizing the shoulders, and extending the elbow joints.1 There are a few key reasons why you might choose to build their strength using dumbbells:

  • Simulates real life lifting – Lifting a dumbbell over your head is like picking up a heavy item from a high shelf, or lifting a 25-pound suitcase into the overhead compartment of an airplane. As speed becomes more familiar, you will be able to use your improved strength in everyday life.
  • Improved balance and coordination – Dumbbells help improve your balance and coordination because you have more control with each movement. Cable machines, on the other hand, do most of this for you, as they don’t always encourage you to activate your stabilizing muscles.
  • diversity – Because the dumbbell is a free weight, it offers a plethora of exercises and variety that a fixed machine can’t compete with.

Finally, dumbbells make amazing tools for strength training at home or in the office for those days when you can’t get to the gym. Plus, we don’t think your boss will be too happy with a cable machine under your desk!

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6 Dumbbell Tricep Workout

Before diving into these tricep exercises, it’s crucial to make sure you’re working with the right weight of dumbbells. Too-heavy dumbbells can throw off your form and make you more susceptible to injury; A very light set is a recipe for inefficient workouts and slow to yield results.

Perfect weight should make those last few reps feel challenging, but not impossible. If you think you can reach the desired rep count for each set While maintaining proper formYou have chosen the right weight. If you think you can easily exceed your chosen number of reps, choose a heavier one.

Remember: The goal is to tire your triceps, which will encourage them to adapt and strengthen with each workout. Once you’ve found that “Goldilocks” sweet spot, it’s time to get lifting.

So when it’s upper arm day, consider doing this dumbbell tricep exercise with the classic reverse fly and Pullover exercise.

#1 Folding Triceps Kickback

This dumbbell exercise is a lively jumping-off point for any tricep routine. Tricep kickbacks are an easy, slow, and excellent way to warm up your elbows—and any exercise that trains the muscles individually can help correct muscle imbalances.2

Here’s how to start this tricep exercise:

  1. Bend your upper body forward, making a 90-degree angle at your waist. Keep a slight bend in the knees and imagine weaving your ribs towards your navel.
  2. Take a dumbbell in one hand and place your other hand on the small of your back.
  3. Bring the dumbbell toward your upper body, stopping when your elbows are parallel to your sides. Keep your arms close to your body for each rep. Repeat until your arms feel tired, then switch to the other side.

variation: You can do this triceps exercise with weights in both hands, working both arms simultaneously.

#2 Close-Grip Dumbbell Press

For this exercise, you’ll lie on a bench, which will target your triceps as well as your shoulders and chest. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Lie supine (face up) on a flat bench with two dumbbells and feet on the floor
  2. Hold your dumbbells above you with your arms close to your body.
  3. Lower the dumbbells until your upper arms are parallel to your torso. Then, lift your arms up until they are perpendicular to the floor. Repeat.

#3 Dumbbell Skullcrusher

Don’t be alarmed by the name—done safely, this tricep exercise won’t make any contact with your head! Lie on your flat bench, grab one of your dumbbells, and begin:

  1. Lie down on the bench and plant your feet firmly on the floor.
  2. Grab a dumbbell by the weight with both your hands and hold it above you. Your arms should be at right angles to the ceiling.
  3. Bend at the elbows and keep your wrists firm, pointing the weight toward your forehead. arms extended; Repetition

Note: For single arm tricep exercises, it is best to use light weights. You can go a grade heavier for exercises where you’re using both arms at the same time.

#4 Dumbbell triceps extension

You can sit or stand for this dumbbell exercise. It targets all three heads of your triceps (lateral head, medial head, and long head) simultaneously.

Whether you’re doing standing or seated tricep extensions, grab a dumbbell and start this tricep workout:

  1. Grasp your dumbbell with the weighted end with both hands. Hold the back of your head.
  2. Lower the dumbbell as far as feels natural, then raise it just before you fully extend your arms. Repeat.

variation: You can perform this dumbbell tricep extension exercise with one arm at a time using a light weight. Use the same motion and rest your non-lifting arm on the elbow of the lifting arm. It can help improve alignment and proprioception.

#5 Triceps Gravity Press

Don’t be surprised if you “feel the burn” with this exercise—you need to constantly work your triceps to keep the dumbbell from falling.

Find a flat bench and two dumbbells and begin:

  1. lie on the bench with a dumbbell in each hand; The forearms should be parallel to the floor. The bottom of each weight should be on the side of your cheek.
  2. Extend your arms in front of your head, maintaining the same height as the starting position. Bend at the elbows and repeat.

#6 Dumbbell Z-Press

Has anyone else stolen the bench? No sweat (well, maybe some). This triceps exercise requires no bench and is easy to learn if you’re just building your skills with dumbbells.

Grab one or two dumbbells depending on your preference and start:

  1. Sit on the ground with your feet in front of you, making an “L” shape on the floor. Pull your belly button toward your spine and bend your knees if your hamstrings are tight.
  2. Hold a dumbbell in each hand or take one at a time.
  3. Start with your arms fully folded and the dumbbells just above your shoulders. Keep your elbows tucked in toward the midline.
  4. Raise the dumbbell above your head until your arms are fully extended and slowly lower it down. Go easy on your triceps – controlling the descent of the dumbbell is key to this exercise.
  5. Repeat.

How to choose the right number of delegates

The good news is that there are plenty of dumbbell tricep exercises to add to your workout routine, but it all comes down to reps and sets. Generally speaking, there are three main things you might want to focus on building in the gym: Endurance, strengthAnd Hypertrophy. All of these can be the purpose of your strength training workout, which when combined with aerobic exercise creates a well-balanced routine.

The strength training objective you set for yourself on any given gym day will help you determine the ideal weight for your dumbbell triceps exercises — light, medium heavy or heavy.

Additionally, each fitness goal will affect how many repetitions and sets you use to organize your tricep workout sessions. Let’s take a look at each to find your ideal routine:

  • Endurance – When you want to increase Amount Your muscles can work, you are training Endurance. Aim for a lighter weight, with more reps per set, eg 10 to 14 times per setAnd 2 to 3 sets.
  • strength – Strength training means increasing the amount of weight you can lift by gradually working on a dumbbell rack from week to week or month to month. Set goals 6 to 10 repetitions per setwith 3 to 6 sets.
  • Hypertrophy – Hypertrophy refers to the process of muscle tissue breaking down and then rebuilding. Resistance exercise is one of the most powerful ways to activate this biological process – and it’s required the least reps and sets3 Set goals 4 to 6 repetitions per setand a 2 sets max.

Work out smarter with Choose Fitness

With proper form and a little insight, experimenting with exercises for your triceps will have you feeling like a dumbbell master in no time. But learning your way around each new piece of equipment should never feel boring—we want to keep every sweat session fresh and engaging.

Choose Fitness Discover new ways to work out and make a routine feel inspiring, welcoming fitness enthusiasts of all levels. Vary your workout with group classes on demand Ichuz virtual workouts, and an inclusive fitness community that cheers you on with every milestone you pass.

Choose Fitness experts are here to help you every step of the way. Learn about our membership and stop at a location by searching for “gym near me” online to see what your future holds in fitness.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. NCBI. Anatomy, shoulder and upper limb, triceps muscle. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK536996/
  2. Ace fitness. One-sided training facility. https://www.acefitness.org/resources/pros/expert-articles/7035/the-benefits-of-unilateral-training/
  3. UNM How to grow muscle? https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/musclesgrowLK.html

What is a hack squat?

What is a hack squat?

With current popularity life hack, It is easy to guess Hack squat Some modern variations to solve a problem with the traditional squat. And step though was Made to make normal weighted or normal changes Body weight squatsPeople have been hack squatting since the late 1800s.

The hack squat is usually attributed to the wrestler George Hackenschmidt (hence the “hack”). named), who designed this move to alleviate the impact on the back and hips while isolating the quadriceps muscles worked on targeted development. While some aspects of the workout have evolved over the past century, its thigh-toning principles remain.

So, what you need to know to execute a like safely Russian lion yourself? Below, we’ll cover why this move is worth rediscovering and how to loop it into your workout routine.

How to perform a traditional hack squat

There are several variations of the traditional squat: V squat vs. hack squat vs. bodyweight vs. sumo, and the list goes on. But one of the most popular squat variations is the hack squat. When bodybuilding was in its infancy, Hackenschmidt didn’t have the equipment used for hack squats in modern gyms. However, he wanted barbells and strength. One day, he decided to combine the two, bending the knees and giving birth to the hack squat.

The type of hack squat that the Russian lion was doing in the early 20th century required little equipment and is still widely practiced today. Here’s how to prepare for a traditional hack squat:

  1. Choose your weight – Your weight for the hack squat won’t be as heavy as other squat variations. The strength needed to pull off a hack squat comes primarily from your quadriceps, so assess your strength there before deciding how much to lift. Generally, you want to be able to do 2 to 4 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions, so choose the appropriate weight for these goals.Will it be comfortable? They’re squats, so chances are, you’ll feel the burn—just make sure to maintain form.
  2. Set up – Find an area with a mat or other non-slip surface suitable for any type of squat. You shouldn’t drop the load any significant distance, but a padded, shock-absorbing floor won’t hurt if you accidentally drop it. Place a barbell with a plate on the ground behind you and prepare to lift.
  3. to assume – Squat down into a starting position as you would for a traditional squat and grab the weight behind you with an overhand grip. In this position, you should be almost sitting on the bar with your arms by your thighs. The soles of your shoes should be perfectly flat on the ground.

Bend down at your knees and keep your spine as straight as possible. If you find it too difficult to hold the weight from this angle, you can use a platform or rack to elevate it. Then, just go ahead after securing it to start your set with a downward motion.

  1. Drive upwards – Start pushing up from your feet to lift the weight. You should feel most of the force applied from your thighs. As the bar rises up, extend your hips and straighten your legs as much as possible. As you reach full extension, flex your quads tightly to support a little extra weight. Your back should be as straight as an arrow throughout this movement to prevent injury.
  2. Relax down – Return the weight to the ground with a slow, controlled movement. Basically, reverse the motions you did to lift the weight. Bend at the knees and lower your back until you’re almost sitting on the bar again. Spinal stability is very important – your back should not arch at any point throughout the movement.
  3. Repeat until you reach your goal – Keep pushing until you hit the reps and sets you’re aiming for As with any exercise, ensure adequate rest between sets, usually about 2 to 3 minutes. Leave at least 48 hours between workouts as well– Although your muscles could welcome a few extra days off!

This tried and true method of hack squatting is a preferred method for free-weight enthusiasts and limited equipment. It has a dozen decades of proven gains under its weightlifting belt and is an effective exercise as long as you nail the form.

If the barbell hack squat isn’t your thing, however, there is a more modern method of doing the hack squat that has become popular in the weightlifting community.

Getting a great workout can take many forms.  Explore our group classes for every level!

How to use a machine to hack the squat

Honestly, “What are hack squats?” The question has two correct answers. They can be done with or without the help of machines and both types of exercises are slightly different from each other. Barbell hack squat alternatives include the machine hack squat workout. If you’re lucky enough to have a gym membership with a hack squat machine, you can use modern technology to apply George Hackenschmidt’s age-old fitness nuances.

The process of hack squatting with a machine is similar to doing it with free weights, but with a few twists. Getting Started:

  1. Set up and load the machine – Set the machine in a position where the supports rest comfortably on your shoulders when you are at full extension. You should be able to handle a heavy load with the assistance of the machine rather than free weight lifting, being sure not to stack too much to avoid injury. You can always add, but if you hurt yourself, you can’t lift anything.
  2. climb inside – Get into the starting position with your back firmly against the back pad with your shoulders supported squarely. Your feet should be in line with your body, facing forward and planted flat on the platform. Release the safety handles and…
  3. Slide down – The pressure of the weight and the force of gravity will naturally begin to push you down. Bend at the knees and slowly lower the weight until your quads are at about a 90° angle to the machine frame. Your back should be firmly planted against the pad and the amount you take shouldn’t feel like it’s crushing you.
  4. Push back up – Run your feet on the platform and stretch your legs to their maximum. As with a normal hack squat, flex your quads into full extension to lift the load as high as possible.
  5. do more – Similar rules regarding reps, sets, and rest govern machine-assisted and free-weight hack squats. Do what you feel comfortable doing, set goals and follow a plan to outdo yourself the next time you’re out hacking.

Both types of hack squats encourage the development of lower body muscle groups and make you stronger. They are quite specific in the areas they target, however, so hack squats may not be the right exercise for everyone.

Normal squat vs free weight hack squat vs machine-assisted hack squat

The hack squat is a compound exercise specifically designed to target the quadriceps. That said, no muscle really works alone. During any exercise, we (unknowingly or unknowingly) work multiple parts of our body together.

Different exercises can be used to isolate specific muscles for maximum work and growth. To understand whether hack squats can help you achieve your fitness goals, you can consider what they do with conventional squats:

  • Regular squats – The traditional squat is the unwavering leg-day lift that, according to popular advice, should never be skipped. This is definitely a go-to for those looking for all-around development, especially around glue.

Honestly, normal squats are versatile and engage your leg muscles, hips and back. They also improve knee strength and even activate core muscles. If you’re looking to improve strength in general, it’s hard to find a better movement than the classic squat.

  • Free weight hack squats – As previously mentioned, hack squats are designed to isolate the quadriceps and work them as much as possible. Using free weights, however, does not completely exclude the activation of other muscle groups. Barbell squats require you to engage many parts of your body to stabilize and balance the weight. Those muscles closest to the quads—your calves, glutes, and lower back—will come into play, especially when hack squatting with free weights.
  • Hack squats with a machine – Machines can optimally isolate muscles by eliminating form brakes and doing load stabilization work for you. Even on a hack squat machine, you don’t only engage your quadriceps during repetitions. The rest of you won’t have to do nearly as much work during a machine hack squat, however, which means your quads will take the brunt of the load.

Now that you have a better idea of ​​which leg muscles, as well as other muscle groups, are best activated by different squats, you can decide which style to execute the next time you hit the gym.

Or, you can try them all—whatever feels right for you!

Pop your perfect squat at Choose Fitness

If you’re looking for a premier place to give hack squatting a try, work with Fitness Professionals. Choose Fitness. Whether you’re hacking away at free weights, a machine, or sticking with the classic squat, Chuze has the space and equipment for you.

Not much of a squatter? No problem – browse Ichuz The app for inspiration for all types of workouts, from beginner yoga to HIIT, to discover video series for every fitness level.

Choose whether you join one of the groups Fitness class Or train 1:1 with an experienced trainer, the pros at Chuz want you to leave feeling inspired (and sweaty). Find one in your area by searching forgym near meAnd stop by to learn how our community can help you achieve your fitness dreams.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. Men’s Health. Want Monster Quads? Time to learn the hack squat. https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a28133625/hack-squat/
  2. barbend George Hackenschmidt: Father of the bench press and hack squat. https://barbend.com/george-hackenschmidt/
  3. The study of physical culture. Three old-school squats you’re not doing. https://physicalculturestudy.com/2017/02/02/three-old-school-squats-youre-not-doing/
  4. Livestrong. A hack squat vs. A back squat. https://www.livestrong.com/article/538392-a-hack-squat-vs-a-back-squat/
  5. The study of physical culture. Three old-school squats you’re not doing. https://physicalculturestudy.com/2017/02/02/three-old-school-squats-youre-not-doing/
  6. Livestrong. A hack squat vs. A back squat. https://www.livestrong.com/article/538392-a-hack-squat-vs-a-back-squat/
  7. Muscle and strength. Machine Hack Squat Video Exercise Guide. https://www.muscleandstrength.com/exercises/hack-squat.html
  8. National Library of Medicine. Differences in quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscle activity during different squat exercises. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8783452/
  9. University of Delaware. Free weight vs. Machine: How should you choose? https://sites.udel.edu/coe-engex/2018/04/03/free-weights-vs-machines-how-should-you-choose/