Month: January 2023

5 Benefits of Resistance Bands

5 Benefits of Resistance Bands

For some people, building muscle and tackling your exercise goals means investing in heavy weights or other equipment. But what if you prefer to keep your exercise gear light? Although this may sound like a paradox, it is is It’s possible to build muscle with exercise equipment that isn’t a nuisance to lug around. That’s where resistance bands come in.

These durable rubber bands are a great way to stay on top of your physical fitness goals without breaking the bank. Better yet, they are easy to use, store and take with you These exercise bands can be used in many workouts for upper body as well as lower body. Use them for muscle strength training, including body weight exercises, or even for recovery.

Curious about the benefits of resistance bands? We’ll break down five reasons why you might want to consider adding them to your routine.

#1 They help build energy

A top benefit of resistance bands is that they can help you with what is often a central goal of any workout routine: strengthening your muscles.

They are not adverse replacements for weights. Research shows that resistance bands can be just as effective for building muscle as using free weights or weight-training gym equipment.1

Also, there are many ways that exercises with resistance bands can mimic most workouts from gym weight machines and free weights. You can use resistance bands for a variety of exercises, including:

  • Squats
  • Karl
  • chest pressing

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#2 They improve your flexibility

If you’re looking for ways to improve your flexibility and keep your joints and muscles stable, you’ll be happy to know that resistance band benefits include increased flexibility.

There is ample research to support the claim that using resistance bands can benefit your flexibility. In fact, in 2017, a review of 19 independent studies found that resistance bands were effective in improving flexibility in 649 older people.2 This suggests that regular use of resistance bands can help you gain better flexibility and increase your range of motion.

#3 They support your balance

The benefits of resistance bands don’t stop at improving your flexibility. There is considerable evidence to suggest that regular use of resistance bands can improve your balance and stability while on your feet.2

Many studies have linked the use of resistance bands to improved flexibility in older people, even in cases where those people are recovering from fall-related injuries.2

But balance isn’t just about keeping you upright. According to some research, having good balance can benefit you by:2

  • Improve your mental health
  • Improve the quality of your life

Add resistance bands to your routine the next time you’re doing lunges or perhaps bosu ball exercises to challenge and strengthen your balance.

#4 They go where you go

Another great advantage of using resistance bands is their portability. Despite the wide range of exercises you can perform with them, resistance bands don’t require much space for storage or packing. They are lightweight and adaptable, meaning they are easy to take with you

This type of mobility is especially convenient when you’re on vacation, traveling for work, or otherwise traveling and don’t want to fall out of your fitness routine. You can simply fold up your resistance bands, stick them in your suitcase or carry them all and you’re good to go.

Thanks to their portability, resistance bands can be a helpful solution for anyone who struggles to keep up with weight training while away from home. Instead of skipping your routine when you’re separated from your equipment, you can simply take the bands with you.

And by helping you keep your routine consistent, resistance bands can help you avoid problems that may come from not exercising, such as:

  • Muscle catabolism
  • Slow progress
  • Loss of motivation

The next time you leave the house, don’t forget to throw a few of your resistance exercise bands in your suitcase.

#5 They are amazing for recovery

Being able to control resistance levels and varying resistance exercises also makes them beneficial for recovery. If you’ve recently suffered an injury that has made your regular workout routine difficult or impossible, resistance bands may be the secret to keeping you on track during your recovery period. One of the top resistance band benefits is how helpful they are for working out while you get better.

In fact, resistance bands can be helpful even when a specific injury isn’t to blame. For example, some studies suggest that regular use of resistance bands may be beneficial for people who experience pain from medical conditions such as arthritis.

In one study, participants who used resistance bands at least three times a week noticed the following improvements:3

  • pain reduction
  • Increase efficiency

Choose Fitness to reach your fitness goals

When you have physical fitness goals, you need an arsenal of workout gear and equipment that meets your needs—whether it’s portability or support for recovery. But you also need a community that supports your efforts and guides you on how to achieve them. That’s where Choose Fitness comes in.

A Choose Fitness, we’re making the gym experience one that’s enjoyable, stress-free and effective for anyone who wants to make fitness a priority. Across our facilities, we offer fitness class, Best gym equipment, friendly staff members, and a iChuze app To keep you on track even when you can’t make it.

Ready to work out in the world’s best gyms? Find a Choose Fitness Center near you by searchinggym near meAnd start today.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. Cleveland Clinic. How effective are resistance bands for weight training? https://health.clevelandclinic.org/should-you-try-resistance-bands-for-strength-training/#
  2. National Library of Medicine. Effectiveness of resistance exercises using elastic bands on flexibility and balance in community-dwelling older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5599848/
  3. National Library of Medicine. Effects of resistance exercise using elastic bands on pain and function in patients with degenerative knee arthritis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7008024/

5 Try exercising with resistance bands

5 Try exercising with resistance bands

Resistance bands—a simple, lightweight and flexible piece of exercise equipment—can often be overlooked at the gym in favor of heavy dumbbells or high-tech equipment. But just because something is simple doesn’t mean it won’t pack a wallop in your workout.

Resistance bands have many benefits no matter what your fitness journey or goal. Resistance bands can be a particularly beneficial addition to any strength training regimen. Plus, they can be used by any skill level—from gym newbies to experienced deadlifters—to quickly build more strength in your upper body, glutes, hips, thighs, and calves.

If you’re new to working out with resistance bands, or if you’re looking for a refresher on how to bring something edgy to your strength-training regimen, we’ve got your back. This versatile addition to your gym kit can have you quickly swapping heavy equipment for something a little more flexible.

What is a resistance band?

The basic principle of resistance bands is that the more you stretch them, the more your muscles have to work. Your muscles generate force as they fight against the band’s tension.

It’s a simple principle. But not all resistance bands will give you the same workout. Resistance bands come in different tension levels and styles. Watch out for the following variations:

  • Therapy Band – These flat pieces of elastic may be the ones you are most familiar with. They generally have low resistance and are particularly helpful for stretching and improving mobility.
  • Tube band with handle – These round bands may also be called “fit tube” resistance bands. Strength trainers love them for upper body work, and you can use them as a replacement for dumbbells in moves like bicep curls or shoulder presses.
  • Figure 8 Band – These are similar to tube bands, but instead of handles, you have soft grips. They tend to be shorter than other types of resistance bands.
  • Ankle Resistance Bands – Ankle resistance bands are designed specifically for lower body work. They come with velcro so you can wrap them around your ankles and add some resistance to your foot lifts and side steps.
  • Pull Up Bands – If you’re training to do push-ups or pull-ups, you’ll want these bands in your fitness toolkit. They help support your body as you learn to pull yourself up over a bar. They tend to be longer than other bands and pack a heavy punch.

If you’re at your local gym, you’ll notice that resistance bands come in a variety of colors. A general rule of thumb is that the darker the color of a resistance band, the greater the tension. When you’re first starting your resistance training, start with mild tension. Then you can work your way up as your muscle strength increases.

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Upper Body Resistance Band Exercise Workout

A big advantage of resistance bands is that you can use them to exercise almost every part of your body. When it comes to your upper half, there are a variety of effective exercises that can increase strength in your arms, shoulders, abs, and more.

Here are two resistance band exercises to add to your upper body routine.

#1 Lateral lift

Some people may also call this move “lateral growth”. Whatever you call it, you’ll mostly feel the tension in your shoulders (or lateral deltoid muscles). Your front deltoids and upper traps will also get a workout. To perform this resistance band exercise:

  1. Start by stepping in the middle of your resistance band. You can use a foot or two to hold the band. Grasp the ends of the band with both hands and start with your arms at your sides.
  2. Slowly raise your arms until they are parallel to the floor.
  3. Lower your arms until they are at your sides again.
  4. That one is representative. Repeat 10 times.

#2 Chest press

This is the perfect exercise for people who hate push-ups but still want to work their chest and arms. Chest press is a fun move to target your biceps, triceps and chest. You can do it sitting or standing.

  1. Start with the resistance band behind you. Hold one end of the resistance band in each hand.
  2. Begin with your elbows bent and your hands near your shoulders.
  3. Straighten your elbows as you push your arms straight out in front of you, parallel to the floor.
  4. Return your hands to your shoulders.
  5. Your first rep is done. Repeat this 10 times.

Lower body exercises with resistance bands

If you’re ready to turn up the heat on classic lower body moves like squats, a resistance band is all you need. Here’s how to start training to strengthen your legs, hips and glutes.

#3 Squat

Everyone’s favorite hurt-it-is-better move is elevated to the next level with a resistance band. You will feel the burn in your glutes and quad muscles.

  1. Place resistance bands around your feet and just above your knees. Stand with feet slightly wider than hip-distance apart. Your feet should also rotate slightly (about 5 to 10 degrees).
  2. Lower yourself into a squat position, pushing your hips back. As you do this, keep the resistance band taut by pushing your thighs out. Remember to keep your knees in line with your toes.
  3. Stand back up and leave the band slightly.
  4. Repeat for 10 repetitions.

For a more challenging workout, increase the resistance level after each set.

#4 Clamshells

It’s not too hard to guess how this exercise got its name. This is especially useful for targeting your outer thighs, glutes, and buttocks. (And since you’re lying down, it can rest the rest of your leg between other exercises.) To do this resistance band exercise:

  1. Lie on your right side with your hips and legs stacked on top of each other. Slip the resistance band just above your knees.
  2. Bend your knees to about a 90-degree angle, keeping your feet in line with your tailbone.
  3. Keeping your feet in place, lift your top knee up to the ceiling. Hold for one second, then lower your knees. (This should mimic the shape of a clamshell opening and closing.)
  4. Repeat for 20 repetitions. Then roll to your left side and repeat.

#5 Lateral walking

Once you add a resistance band this little step back and forth becomes a burn-inducing challenge. You’ll quickly strengthen your glutes and glutes.

  1. Step inside the resistance band and pull up to your thighs.
  2. Dip slowly into a half squat.
  3. Step to the right with your right foot, then bring your left foot up a step to meet it.
  4. Step left with your left foot, then follow through with your right foot.
  5. That one is representative. Repeat 20 times.

Tips for proper resistance band technique

As with most exercises, you will see better results when you are able to maintain proper form. But resistance bands are fairly easy to incorporate into your workout routine. There are just a few pointers to keep in mind when using an exercise band:

  • Do not work with torn resistance bands.
  • If you’re tying a resistance band to a surface like a door, make sure it’s securely attached before starting your exercise.
  • Keep the form you use when exercising without a resistance band.

What are the benefits of resistance band training?

Resistance bands are a popular choice among gym rats for good reason. Once you start using resistance bands, you’ll eventually find yourself swapping them where you’d normally reach for weights.

“Resistance bands may not look like much, but they can strengthen your muscles just as effectively as more traditional weights,” says Christopher Travers, MS, an exercise physiologist at the Cleveland Clinic.1 “In many ways, the bands put more tension on your muscles and make them work more during the movement.”

Some of the benefits of resistance training with a band include:

  • Better strength training – When you use a resistance band for your workout, you are triggering muscle activation. That translates to big power gains.
  • Low body fat- A 2022 study found that people who exercised with resistance bands lost more weight than those who exercised with free weights or bodyweight exercises.2
  • Increase coordination – Working out with a resistance band effectively targets your smaller stabilizer muscles.
  • Low risk of injury – Because resistance bands work with your body’s strength, you’re less likely to overexert yourself than with free weights. Also, you don’t have to worry about injuries due to heavy lifting.
  • adaptability – You can quickly change the intensity of your workout by shortening the length of your band or switching the exercise band for a higher or lower resistance level.
  • Portability – They are light and easy to use. You can put one in your gym bag or suitcase, and it takes up barely any room.
  • affordability – Most resistance bands cost less than $30 and last a lifetime.

Resistance bands can also be used for almost any workout. Bring them along for squats, medicine ball workouts, or light resistance training.

Create your resistance band workout with Choose Fitness

While we hope you feel more confident about working out with a resistance band after reading this, it’s perfectly normal to want some extra support. If you’re still thinking, “I don’t know where to start with resistance bands,” find the one closest to you Choose Fitness Location and start a powerful and supportive training session with one of our experts.

Our knowledgeable and welcoming instructors will help you master the resistance band technique, whether you’re on the gym floor or in one of our Fitness class. You can even join the action from your living room online Ichuz class

Our knowledgeable and caring team will work with you until you fully master your resistance band technique. Your muscles will thank you later.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. Cleveland Clinic. How effective are resistance bands for strength training? https://health.clevelandclinic.org/should-you-try-resistance-bands-for-strength-training/
  2. Frontiers in Physiology. Effects of different resistance exercises on body composition and muscle strength in overweight and/or obese individuals: a systematic review and meta-analysis.. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2021.791999/full
  3. National Library of Medicine. Effects of traditional resistance versus elastic resistance training on muscle strength: a systematic review and meta-analysis.. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6383082/
  4. Fits very well. Selecting and using resistance bands. https://www.verywellfit.com/choosing-and-using-resistance-bands-1229709
  5. Women’s health. 30 resistance band exercises to tone and strengthen your entire body. https://www.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/g29565103/best-resistance-band-exercises/

What is a sled push workout?

What is a sled push workout?

Maybe it’s staring at you from the corner of the gym. Maybe you’re looking at someone else while they use it. You know what a sled push is, but you don’t quite yet to understand It’s…much less how you start using one. Don’t sweat it—we’re here to help.

The weighted sled push is rapidly growing in popularity in gyms across America. The multifunctional workout technique is virtually unbeatable for a total body workout. As you push a sled across the turf, you work almost every muscle, from upper body to lower body. Sled exercises can help you develop better coordination, speed and strength.

While pushing something heavy might not seem like the most enjoyable of workouts, you’ll be thrilled with the results quickly. If you want to join the latest fitness trend (or maybe show up at the gym tomorrow), read on for insider tips on how to master the powerful sled push exercise.

How to do a sled push exercise

From resistance training to muscle strengthening, the sled push is one of the best turf workouts that can benefit many muscle groups. While it may seem fairly straightforward, a great sled push involves a little more than meets the eye. Although, yes, basically what you’re doing is getting behind the sled and pushingThe right technique can help you get the most out of your time at the gym.

Here’s what you need to know before you push a sled for the first time:

  • Maintain a neutral spine – You don’t want your back to round when pushing. But you don’t want it overextended, either.
  • keep it normal- Run like you do without the heavy sled. Nothing fancy.
  • Focus on your core – Your core is what transfers power from your legs to the sled through your arms. Your push will only be as good as your core strength. If you’re just starting out, a few pushups with no weight on the sled can help you focus on engaging your core while running.
  • angle of your body – Keep your body at an angle to the ground for best results. Beginners should start with their body at a forward angle of about 45 degrees. If you’re more advanced, you can angle your body to 90 degrees (almost parallel to the floor).
  • Think about your arm – Your arm position is important in this sled workout because you’ll be using your arms and upper body to push off. A general rule of thumb is to keep your arms straight when you want to go faster. Bend your arms when you are pushing a ton of weight.
  • warming up – Before jumping into an intense sled push workout, spend about 15 minutes making sure your muscles are ready to go.
  • rest – Take a break between each of your strokes. And remember to cool down with light dynamic stretching after your workout.
  • Take it lightly – If it’s your first time sledding, start by pushing the sled without any extra weight. You’ll get a feel for how the sled moves so you can nail perfect form before setting big goals.

Depending on your fitness goals, you can change your sled workout format for different results.

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Push the sled for speed

If you’re pushing the sled to develop strength and build muscle, you’re going to want a heavy weight load. But if you’re working on your speed, aim for lighter loads. Here’s how to perform a sled push for speed:

  1. Load the sled with 25% of your maximum load.
  2. Push 10 to 20 yards.
  3. Rest for a minute.
  4. Repeat six times.

If you don’t know your maximum load, start with about 70% of your body weight. You can adjust from there.

Push the sled to get

When you’re training for strength, you’ll want to load your sled with a heavy weight. Follow these steps to push the sled for power:

  1. Load the sled with a heavy weight (about 70% of your maximum load).
  2. Rushed for 25 yards.
  3. Rest for a minute.
  4. Repeat six times.

What are the benefits of a sled push workout?

Incorporating a new piece of equipment into your routine can be intimidating, but there are good reasons to try the sled push workout. Working out with a sled push (or “prowler sled”) at your local gym can help you meet your highest fitness goals, including:1

  • Hypertrophy (muscle growth)
  • Fat loss
  • Full body conditioner
  • Functional training
  • Burn calories
  • Speed ​​training

Plus, pushing a heavily loaded sled can be easier on your body than lifting that super-heavy dumbbell. When you’re pushing the Prowler sled, you don’t have to worry about gravity yanking a heavy weight from your hands.

What muscle does a sled push build?

The sled push is a workout that has the unique distinction of helping virtually every muscle from head to toe. Once you begin regular strength training with the sled push, you can expect to see the development of these muscle groups:2

  • Quads
  • Glutes
  • shoulder
  • Triceps
  • the chest
  • Abs
  • Hip flexors
  • Hamstrings
  • the calf

Learn proper sled push technique with Choose Fitness

As you start adding sled pushes to your training regimen, be sure to take it slow. Beginners should start with sled push workouts only two or three times per week. As you learn your way around the sled, you can adjust the sled training to your body’s limits and abilities, adding weight as you do it four times per week.

If you are looking for professional guidance to take you to the next level, visit your nearest location Choose Fitness. Our helpful and knowledgeable fitness experts will make sure you’re performing the perfect sled push technique and even help tailor your workout to your goals.

You can join us in person Fitness class Or work with Chuz in your living room with our streaming Ichuz Class We’ll give you the push you need to handle the sled like a pro.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. Runner’s World. Prowler Sled Workouts can increase your speed, strength and power. https://www.runnersworld.com/training/a36422108/prowler-sled-push-workouts/
  2. Healthline. How to use the sled push to build strength, speed and endurance. https://www.healthline.com/health/sled-push

6 Bosu Ball Exercises You’ll Love

5 Bosu Ball Exercises You’ll Love

You can run over it, dodge it with a ten foot pole, or just not know what to do with it. Is this your friend’s new abstract sculpture? No—it’s Bosu ball.

Although it’s a staple in almost every gym, it may not be your first piece of gravity equipment. A half-sphere attached to a platform, the bosu ball can be used to improve your balance, strengthen your core muscles, work your upper body and lower body, and get your heart pumping.

Whether you’re a bosu buff or not, finding new exercises and workout equipment can help keep your routine fresh. To get you on the right track, we’ve compiled a series of five bosu ball exercises that can help train your balance, stability, and strength. Let’s jump into it.

What is bosu ball?

A bosu ball is a dome-shaped piece of gym equipment similar to a pilates ball that someone cuts in half. Although it sounds far-fetched, the origin story of this balance-training tool is not far-fetched.

American physical trainer David Wake invented this balance training product in the late 1990s to help him overcome chronic back pain.1 He tried training his balance and core with a traditional Swiss ball, but found that cutting the ball in half made it a safer surface to train on. Over time, he saw his condition improve and began recommending it to his clients.

Incorporating bosu ball exercises into your workout routine can help you:

  • Train balance and stability
  • Strengthen your core
  • Expands movement capabilities

Balance training exercises are an important part of any fitness routine, as they can help correct strength imbalances and prevent potential injuries that can result from them.2 Additionally, strengthening your core has a plethora of potential benefits, such as:3

  • Relief from lower back pain
  • Improved posture
  • Increases balance and stability
  • Improved performance in daily activities such as bending, reaching and lifting

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5 bosu ball exercises to add to your routine

Bosu means “both sides used”, because you can perform the exercise on the flat or round side of the ball.1 After regular use, you will see improvements in your balance and core strength on and off the ball.

While the exercises you can do with a bosu ball are seemingly endless, we’ve narrowed them down to five of our favorite variations to help you get started with your bosu ball workouts.

#1 Single-leg raise

Start your routine with a simple yet effective balance training exercise. Single-leg raises on an unstable surface can increase your ability to find and maintain your center of gravity.

Here’s how to complete this bosu ball exercise:

  1. Place the bosu ball down next to the platform.
  2. Step into the center of the Bosu ball with one foot.
  3. Hold the other leg for 30 seconds. You can start by lifting your feet just a few inches off the ground, then as your balance improves, raise your knees to hip height.
  4. Repeat on both sides.

Exercise tip: If you find it difficult to balance at first, position yourself against a wall or support surface to prevent falling.

#2 Forward lunge

Lunges are the perfect exercise to try on a Bosu ball, as they already work to build muscle strength and stability in your lower body. The forward lunge in particular targets your knees, side glutes and quads.4

Here’s how to combine a forward lunge with a Bosu ball:

  1. Place the bosu ball down next to the platform.
  2. Step into the center of the Bosu ball with one foot, keeping the other foot planted on the ground behind you.
  3. Bend your knees as you lower your body until the front knee reaches a 90-degree angle.
  4. Back your body up and finish your repetitions on that leg before switching to the opposite.

Exercise tip: To prevent injury, make sure your front knee doesn’t extend before your ankle when bending. If it does, you may need to readjust your position.

#3 Bosu Burpee

Ah, everyone’s favorite but dreaded exercise—the burpee. To add an extra challenge to this burn-tastic workout, you’ll be lifting extra weights on bosu balls as you jump and work extra hard to balance yourself during pushups.

Here’s how to do Bosu Burpees:

  1. Place the bosu ball on the floor in front of you, next to the platform.
  2. Assume a high plank position, occupying the platform at 9 and 3 o’clock.
  3. Jump your feet forward toward the bosu ball, still holding it with both hands.
  4. Push yourself into a standing position by lifting the bosu ball fully over your head as you jump up.
  5. Lower the bosu to the floor, jump your feet back into a high plank position, and do a pushup.
  6. Repeat for as many sets as you like.

Exercise tip: If you want to opt for a lighter version, you can skip the jump at the end of the pushup as you raise the bosu. If you want to add some extra weight, hold a weighted exercise ball as you roll from side to side.

#4 Tummy Twists

These core training and engaging exercises are fairly difficult without the bosu ball. But if you’re up for some extra difficulty, ditch the mat for a bocce ball. Adaptation is fairly simple:

  1. Place the bosu ball down next to the platform.
  2. Sit in the center of the basu and make an av shape with your body, extending your legs and arms in front of you.
  3. Keeping your core muscles engaged, move your clasped hands from side to side.

Exercise tip: Looking to train your arms as well? Hold a weighted ball to move from side to side as you twist.

#5 Double board

If you’re looking for an exercise that feels more like a game than a workout, then using a bosu ball is for you. With this balance exercise, you’re going to move in all directions with it at your own pace, seeing how long you can last without jumping. Start the bosu ball workout with these instructions:

  1. Place the bosu ball next to the platform.
  2. Stand on the board and find your balance.
  3. Move slowly forwards, backwards and sideways.
  4. Make circles on one side, then the other.
  5. Repeat until you feel the burn in both legs or can no longer maintain your balance.

Exercise tip: Keep a slight bend in the knees during this exercise to help maintain balance.

Start your bosu training with Choose Fitness

From lower body to balance exercises, the bosu ball is a versatile tool that can exercise different muscle groups. Still, trying out a new piece of fitness equipment for the first time at the gym can be intimidating, especially something as challenging as a Bosu ball. That’s why choosing a gym with a community culture that uplifts and supports each member is essential to truly enjoying your fitness journey.

A Choose Fitness, increasing the confidence of our members is our number one priority. From exercise advice to modifications, our trainers are eager to help you tick off those exercise goals. Find a Chuze location near you by searching forgym near me” and let us be a part of your fitness journey starting today.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. The study of physical culture. History of Basu Ball. https://physicalculturestudy.com/2018/03/21/the-history-of-the-bosu-ball/
  2. PubMed. Balance training exercises reduce lower-limb strength asymmetry in young tennis players. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24790496/
  3. Harvard Health. Real-world benefits of strengthening your core. https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/the-real-world-benefits-of-strengthening-your-core
  4. Livestrong. What muscles do lunges work? https://www.livestrong.com/article/439335-what-muscles-do-lunges-work-out/

10 Medicine Ball Exercises You’ll Love

10 Medicine Ball Workouts You’ll Love

With such a variety in workout equipment, machines, and training techniques, no two workout routines should look the same. It’s worth trying your hand at several to see which one you have the most fun with—and one humble yet powerful strength-training tool that’s a must-try is the medicine ball.

The versatility of this weighted ball can make it your next training tool. Also, if you’re wondering how to stay motivated to workout, trying new exercises and equipment like the medicine ball may be the key. To give you some inspiration, we’ve compiled ten medicine ball workouts that will make planning your next gym session a breeze.

What is a medicine ball, anyway?

Although it’s a staple in any modern gym, the medicine ball is nothing new in the fitness world. These weighted balls date back to ancient Greece. Hippocrates supposedly gave his patients animal skins filled with weighted ingredients and instructed them to throw them around as part of their cure.1 Even gladiators used them in their training exercises.

Today’s medicine balls have advanced quite a bit over their animal skin cousins. Now, the majority have a solid rubber outer surface and vary in size and weight. You can identify them by looking for a workout ball that mostly resembles a basketball in size and feel.

The American Council on Exercise endorses this training tool, confirming that strong medicine ball training can help you improve:2

  • strength
  • pose
  • the movement
  • Athletic skills

Not sure yet? Grab your nearest medicine ball and let’s get to work.

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10 Medicine Ball Workout

Whether you’re looking to refresh your warmup routine or work up a sweat with a full-body workout, these ten med ball workouts have something for everyone.

Before you get started, you’ll want to choose the right medicine ball for you. Although they’re easy to use, they’re not necessarily one-size-fits-all—depending on your fitness level, you can choose a light or heavy fitness ball. The point is that you feel your muscles working, but not to stop the exercise several times in each set. Our basic guide is as follows:

  • Apprentice – Up to 6 lbs
  • intermediate – 6 to 8 lbs
  • developed – 12 pounds or more

If you’re using a medicine ball for the first time, focus on maintaining good form, choosing a comfortable weight, and controlling your movements to prevent injury. Once you’ve mastered the medicine ball exercises yourself, you can adjust your number of repetitions and sets to fit your fitness goals. Let’s jump into the first one!

#1 Medicine ball overhead pass

A dynamic warm-up is essential to prevent injury during a workout. In addition to stretching and warming up your muscles, warm-ups increase your blood flow, body temperature, and heart rate, continuously preparing your body for the main workout.3

Either sitting or standing, try this upper body medicine ball workout during your next warm-up routine:

  1. Begin with a medicine ball at your side, with an engaged core and a straight back.
  2. Raise the ball above your head and grab it with your other hand.
  3. Continue this pass-off above your head to bring the ball down and then raise again.

variation: If you are looking for more intensity, you can toss the ball from the hands above your head.

#2 Hamstring extension

Want to exercise your lower body? Another medicine ball exercise to help prepare your body for the upcoming sweat sesh is the hamstring extension. You may feel like you are only in the warm-up section of your training.

Here’s how to complete this exercise:

  1. Begin in a standing position with the ball held above your head, arms fully extended.
  2. Lean forward from the hips and keep your back and arms straight.
  3. Extend one leg forward and your arms down, tapping the ball near your toes.
  4. Return the ball to the starting position and repeat.

#3 Reverse Lunge and Overhead Reach

A unique variation on the typical lunge, this warm-up exercise can help open the hips and shoulders. Here’s how to perform it:

  1. Begin in a standing position with a medicine ball between your hands at your waist.
  2. Bring the ball above your head and drop into a lunge.
  3. Swing the ball to the opposite side of your forward foot.
  4. Return to the starting position and repeat.

#4 Knee lifts

To get your heart rate up without stepping on a treadmill, grab a medicine ball and tackle this next exercise. Don’t be fooled by its simple appearance—it’s a cremation in disguise:

  1. Begin in a standing position with the medicine ball above your head.
  2. As you lower it, lift your right knee so it touches the ball around hip height.
  3. Return to the starting position and repeat on your left leg, alternating legs.

#5 Triceps extension with partner

A triceps extension is a classic exercise you’ve tried with dumbbells before. But using a medicine ball gives you the option of throwing it to a partner between reps, increasing the intensity—and the fun! Catching exercises are an excellent way to practice hand-eye coordination.

Choose your partner and follow these instructions together:

  1. Begin in a sitting or standing position facing your partner, holding the medicine ball behind your head.
  2. Raise the ball over your head and toss it to your partner. Their hands should be raised above their head, ready to catch.
  3. They will drop the ball back to the same starting position and return it to you.
  4. Be sure to keep your elbows as close to your head as possible when you hold the ball and keep your triceps engaged as you lower, lift and throw the ball.

#6 Tummy Twists

If you’ve ever worked out with medicine balls before, you’re probably familiar with using them to increase abdominal curls and work your core muscles. If not, you’ll soon find out why. Increase the intensity of your twist with these steps:

  1. Begin in a seated position with bent knees. You can plant or raise your legs depending on the intensity you want. Lean your upper body back slightly.
  2. Holding the medicine ball with both hands, twisting from left to right, movement control.

variation: To make it a partner exercise, sit parallel to your gym buddy and pass the ball to each other in between twists.

#7 Medicine Ball Slam

The medicine ball slam is a great exercise that can help strengthen multiple muscle groups in your upper and lower body. This exercise helps you develop strength and power, but can also increase your heart rate, allowing it to even count as cardio. Since this exercise involves hitting your medicine ball into the ground, doing it outdoors — such as in a grassy area — can help reduce noise and soften the impact. Then, follow these steps to practice the overhead slam:

  1. Begin standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and an exercise ball above your head.
  2. Slam the ball into the ground just in front of your feet.
  3. Sitting down to pick it up.
  4. Bring the ball back over your head and repeat.

#8 Upward Toss

If your home or gym has a wall that’s strong enough to take the impact of a medicine ball, try this upward toss for a twist on the previous slam. It goes like this:

  1. Begin standing facing a wall, holding the medicine ball to your chest.
  2. Squat down, and as you come up, use force to toss the medicine ball toward a point on the wall.
  3. Catch it as it falls and squat, repeating the same movement.

variation: Gym partner feeling a little bored? Grab them to replace your walls so you can work together. They just need to hold their hands above you, ready to catch the ball as you toss it upwards.

#9 Superman

Do not turn your back while training. Although the medicine ball-free Superman exercise is challenging on its own, you can add some additional upper body weight to increase the difficulty. This added medicine ball exercise targets the glutes and back.

  1. Start lying face down on the floor with the medicine ball in front of you.
  2. Reach forward with your hands to catch the ball.
  3. Pause for a second and lift the ball and leg as high as they can go.
  4. Lower the ball and your feet to the ground and repeat.
  5. Be sure to maintain your neck in a neutral, stable position while performing this exercise to avoid injury.

#10 V-up

A set of V-ups with the added weight of a medicine ball is sure to leave you feeling the burn. This exercise combines sit-ups with leg raises to build your core strength and stability. Here’s how to perform them:

  1. Begin lying flat on your back with a medicine ball in your hands.
  2. Engage your core muscles to bring your arms and legs up until your body forms a V formation.
  3. Pass the exercise ball from your hands to your feet and lower your body down.
  4. Repeat, passing the ball from foot to hand and back again.

Be sure to engage your core and use your breath during this exercise. Engage and exhale as you rise up into a V, and engage and inhale as you lower yourself back down to the ground.

Find your fitness community at Chuz

After a few tosses, twists and turns, the medicine ball will become one of your go-to fitness tools. Don’t worry if you feel uneasy at first. New equipment and exercises can take some getting used to – and if you need some help, you can always count on your local gym.

A Choose Fitness, building an inclusive community is our priority. No matter your fitness experience, level, or goal, Choose Fitness experts want to help you master any piece of equipment and create an exciting routine so you can hit the gym (and not away).

Learn about us Membership plan And search to find your nearest Chuzegym near me” to join the fun fitness community you deserve.

Reviewed by:

Ani is Vice President of Fitness at Chuz Fitness and oversees the Group Fitness and Team Training departments. He had a 25+ year career in club management, personal training, group exercise and instructor training. Annie lives in San Diego, CA with her husband and son and loves hot yoga, snowboarding and all things wellness.

Source:

  1. HuffPost. The medicine ball is actually an ancient fitness tool. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/medicine-balls-history_n_5937664
  2. American Council on Exercise. A medicine ball workout for your clients. https://www.acefitness.org/continuing-education/certified/march-2017/6267/a-medicine-ball-workout-for-your-clients/
  3. NSMI. Importance of Warming Up Before Sports – Prevention of Sports Injuries. http://www.nsmi.org.uk/articles/injury-prevention/warming-up.html

» CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Brian Baker

CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Brian Baker

Posted on January 26, 2023 at 10:53 am by Eric Cressey

We welcome Baltimore Orioles relief pitcher Brian Baker to the latest podcast. Brian talks about his multi-sport beginnings, unique mechanics, pitch selection adjustments, training discoveries and recovery techniques.

Special thanks to this event’s sponsor, Proteus Motion. They are changing the way athletes are evaluated and trained with their 3D resistance. the head www.ProteusMotion.coMr. Elite To know more about this cutting-edge technology.

You can follow Brian on Instagram @bryan.baker43 And on Twitter @bryanbaker24.

Sponsor Reminder

Proteus Motion There is a patented technology that allows us to measure force for the overwhelming majority of human movements. Proteus software guides users through a 4-minute physical assessment with unprecedented performance data and insights to trainers, creating a whole new standard for personalized fitness and physical rehabilitation. All of this is enabled by a complete reinvention of resistance training called 3D Resistance. Training strength and acceleration with Proteus’ patented 3D resistance can be safer, more efficient and more effective than traditional resistance training equipment in many cases. I have been a big fan of Proteus for the past few years. We have a unit at both Cressey Sports Performance facilities and actually helped develop the Cressey Power Test for rotational athletes. The information we gather from this test is an absolute game changer in helping us program more optimally for our athletes. Additionally, as a training initiative, work on the Proteus allowed us to train different points on the ball-velocity curve in a rotational pattern in a way that the medicine ball could not.

You can learn more about them by listening Episode 106 of the Elite Baseball Development Podcastor by title www.ProteusMotion.com/elite.

Podcast feedback

If you like what you hear, we’d be thrilled if you’d consider subscribing to the podcast and leaving us an iTunes review. You can do so here.

And, we welcome your suggestions for future guests and questions. Just email [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Sign-up for our free baseball newsletter today and get instant access to a 47-minute presentation from Eric Cressy on personalizing the management of overhead athletes!


Principles of assessment, thoracic outlet syndrome, warm-up and 91mph

CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast – January 2023 Q&A: Evaluation principles, thoracic outlet syndrome, warm-ups and 91mph 13-year-olds

Posted on January 18, 2023 at 5:59 am by Eric Cressey

It’s time for another listener Q&A, so I covered four questions from our listeners on this week’s podcast on the following topics:

  1. “Big Rock” evaluation principle
  2. Why is thoracic outlet syndrome a diagnosis of exclusion?
  3. Key elements of a good warm-up
  4. Injury concerns in young pitchers with elite velocity

Special thanks to this event’s sponsor, Proteus Motion. They are changing the way athletes are evaluated and trained with their 3D resistance. the head www.ProteusMotion.coMr. Elite To know more about this cutting-edge technology.

Sponsor Reminder

Proteus Motion There is a patented technology that allows us to measure force for the overwhelming majority of human movements. Proteus software guides users through a 4-minute physical assessment with unprecedented performance data and insights to trainers, creating a whole new standard for personalized fitness and physical rehabilitation. All of this is enabled by a complete reinvention of resistance training called 3D Resistance. Training strength and acceleration with Proteus’ patented 3D resistance can be safer, more efficient and more effective than traditional resistance training equipment in many cases. I have been a big fan of Proteus for the past few years. We have a unit at both Cressey Sports Performance facilities and actually helped develop the Cressey Power Test for rotational athletes. The information we gather from this test is an absolute game changer in helping us program more optimally for our athletes. Additionally, as a training initiative, work on the Proteus allowed us to train different points on the ball-velocity curve in a rotational pattern in a way that the medicine ball could not.

You can learn more about them by listening Episode 106 of the Elite Baseball Development Podcastor by title www.ProteusMotion.com/elite.

Podcast feedback

If you like what you hear, we’d be thrilled if you’d consider subscribing to the podcast and leaving us an iTunes review. You can do so here.

And, we welcome your suggestions for future guests and questions. Just email [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Sign-up for our free baseball newsletter today and get instant access to a 47-minute presentation from Eric Cressy on personalizing the management of overhead athletes!


» CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Braxton Garrett

CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Braxton Garrett

Posted on January 12, 2023 at 5:22 am by Eric Cressey

We welcome Miami Marlins pitcher Braxton Garrett to the latest podcast. Braxton shares insight into how his mechanics and pitching approach have evolved and how adversity has shaped his ability to compete at the Major League level.

Special thanks to this event’s sponsor, Athletic Greens. the head http://www.athleticgreens.com/cressey And you get a free 10-pack of Athletic Greens travel packets with your first order.

You can follow Braxton on Instagram @braxgarrett And on Twitter @braxgarrett.

Sponsor Reminder

This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. It’s an NSF-certified all-in-one superfood supplement with 75 whole-food source ingredients designed to meet your body’s nutritional needs in 5 key areas of health: 1) Energy, 2) Immunity, 3) Gut Health, 4) hormone support, and 5) healthy aging. the head www.AthleticGreens.com/cressey And claim my special offer today – 10 free travel packs – with your first purchase. I use this product daily and recommend it to our athletes as well. I would encourage you to give it a shot – especially with this great offer.

Podcast feedback

If you like what you hear, we’d be thrilled if you’d consider subscribing to the podcast and leaving us an iTunes review. You can do so here.

And, we welcome your suggestions for future guests and questions. Just email [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Sign-up for our free baseball newsletter today and get instant access to a 47-minute presentation from Eric Cressey on personalizing the management of overhead athletes!


Building a culture for sustainable success with Tim Corbin

CSP Elite Baseball Development Podcast: Building a Culture for Sustained Success with Tim Corbin

Posted on January 5, 2023 at 11:09 am by Eric Cressey

We are pleased to welcome Vanderbilt University head baseball coach Tim Corbin to this week’s podcast to discuss transforming culture in a team environment and what criteria must be present for sustained success. The team speaks to college recruiting, long-term player development strategies and the evolution of student athletes.

Special thanks to this event’s sponsor, Athletic Greens. the head http://www.athleticgreens.com/cressey And you get a free 10-pack of Athletic Greens travel packets with your first order.

Podcast feedback

If you like what you hear, we’d be thrilled if you’d consider subscribing to the podcast and leaving us an iTunes review. You can do so here.

And, we welcome your suggestions for future guests and questions. Just email [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Sign-up for our free baseball newsletter today and get instant access to a 47-minute presentation from Eric Cressy on personalizing the management of overhead athletes!